Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

Delaware And Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

The Delaware & Lehigh Canal National and State Heritage Corridor stretches 165 miles across five counties and some hundred municipalities in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. It follows the historic routes of the Lehigh & Susquehanna Railroad, Lehigh Valley Railroad, the Lehigh Navigation, Lehigh Canal and the Delaware Canal, from Wilkes-Barre to Bristol. The Corridor's mission is to preserve heritage and conserve green space for public use in Bucks, Carbon, Lehigh, Luzerne, and Northampton counties in Pennsylvania.

Read more about Delaware And Lehigh National Heritage CorridorDefinition of A Heritage Corridor, Description, History of The Corridor, Corridor Uses Today, Cities in The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor, Pennsylvania State Parks in The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor

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Famous quotes containing the words corridor, heritage and/or national:

    And now in one hour’s time I’ll be out there again. I’ll raise my eyes and look down that corridor four feet wide with ten lonely seconds to justify my whole existence.
    Colin Welland (b. 1934)

    The heritage of the American Revolution is forgotten, and the American government, for better and for worse, has entered into the heritage of Europe as though it were its patrimony—unaware, alas, of the fact that Europe’s declining power was preceded and accompanied by political bankruptcy, the bankruptcy of the nation-state and its concept of sovereignty.
    Hannah Arendt (1906–1975)

    The word which gives the key to the national vice is waste. And people who are wasteful are not wise, neither can they remain young and vigorous. In order to transmute energy to higher and more subtle levels one must first conserve it.
    Henry Miller (1891–1980)