Dead Horse Ranch State Park

Dead Horse Ranch State Park is a state park of Arizona, USA, on the Verde River in an area known as the Verde River Greenway. Located at approximately 3,300 feet (1,000 m) elevation, Dead Horse Ranch State Park covers 423 acres (1.71 km2) of land with 10 miles (16 km) of hiking trails, 150 campground sites and several picnic areas, along with 23 group camping sites. It also offers trailhead access to the Dead Horse Trail System, located on adjacent Coconino National Forest land. The ranch was originally named by the Ireys family, who sold the land to the state of Arizona to become a state park.

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Dead Horse Ranch State Park - Special Events
... Headquarters for the festival is at Dead Horse Ranch, but events are held throughout the Verde Valley ... Another popular yearly event at Dead Horse Ranch State Park is Verde River Day, which is held annually in September to celebrate the protection of the river's riparian habitat ...

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