Dazzle Camouflage

Dazzle camouflage, also known as razzle dazzle or dazzle painting, was a family of ship camouflage used extensively in World War I and to a lesser extent in World War II. Credited to artist Norman Wilkinson, it consisted of complex patterns of geometric shapes in contrasting colours, interrupting and intersecting each other.

Unlike most other forms of camouflage, dazzle works not by offering concealment but by making it difficult to estimate a target's range, speed and heading. Norman Wilkinson explained in 1919 that dazzle was intended more to mislead the enemy as to the correct position to take up than actually to miss his shot when firing.

Dazzle was adopted by the British Admiralty and the U.S. Navy with little evaluation. Each ship's dazzle pattern was also unique, to avoid making classes of ships instantly recognisable to the enemy. The result was that a profusion of dazzle schemes was tried, and the evidence for their success was at best mixed. So many factors were involved that it was impossible to determine which were important, and whether any of the colour schemes were effective.

Dazzle attracted the notice of artists, with Picasso notably claiming that cubists had invented it.

Read more about Dazzle Camouflage:  Mechanism, Camoufleurs, World War I, World War II, Art History, Modern Use

Other articles related to "camouflage, dazzle camouflage, dazzle":

Camouflage - Dazzle Patterning
... Further information Military camouflage, Dazzle camouflage, and Ship camouflage Most forms of camouflage are made ineffective by movement a deer or ... But one form of 'camouflage' works only when in motion dazzle patterning ... Dazzle camouflage superficially resembles disruptive patterning, but has a different purpose ...
Norman Wilkinson (artist) - World War I Camouflage
... Further information Dazzle camouflage During World War I, while serving in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, he was assigned to submarine patrols in the Dardanelles, Gallipoli and Gibraltar, and, beginning in ... plan was adopted by the British Admiralty, and he was placed in charge of a naval camouflage unit, housed in basement studios at the Royal Academy of Arts ... makers, and construction plan preparators) devised dazzle camouflage schemes, applied them to miniature models, tested the models (using experienced sea observers), and prepared construction diagrams that were used ...
Ship Camouflage - Second World War - Other Navies
... Others had dazzle camouflage, usually in combinations of pale gray, dark gray and sea blue ... its pre-war scheme of light gray overall for its smaller ships, but the larger units mostly had dazzle camouflage of dark gray, light sea blue, light sea green ... Some aircraft carriers had their flight decks painted in a dazzle camouflage, but this seems to have been ineffective ...
Dazzle Camouflage - Modern Use
... moored in Wilmington, North Carolina, United States, are painted in the dazzle camouflage they used during the Second World War ... Dazzle makeup, or "CV dazzle" (computer vision dazzle), to hamper facial recognition software, was inspired by dazzle camouflage ...
Military Tactical Gear - Dazzle Patterning
... Further information Military camouflage, Dazzle camouflage, and Ship camouflage Most forms of camouflage are made ineffective by movement a deer or ... But one form of 'camouflage' works only when in motion dazzle patterning ... Motion dazzle is caused by rapidly-moving bold patterns of contrasting stripes, as when zebras run from a lion ...

Famous quotes containing the word dazzle:

    Those great and glorious actions that dazzle our eyes with their luster are represented by statesmen as the result of great wisdom and excellent design; whereas, in truth, they are commonly the effects of the humors and passions.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)