David J. Davis

David J. Davis (1870–1942) was the 13th Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania from 1923 to 1927.

Political offices
Preceded by
Edward Beidleman
Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania
1923–1927
Succeeded by
Arthur James
Party political offices
Preceded by
Edward Beidleman
Republican nominee for Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania
1922
Succeeded by
Arthur James
Lieutenant Governors and Vice-Presidents of Pennsylvania
Vice-Presidents
  • Bryan
  • M. Smith
  • Moore
  • Potter
  • Ewing
  • Irvine
  • Biddle
  • Muhlenberg
  • Redick
  • Ross
Lieutenants Governors
  • Latta
  • Stone
  • Black
  • Davies
  • Watres
  • Lyon
  • Gobin
  • Brown
  • Murphy
  • Reynolds
  • McClain
  • Beidleman
  • D. Davis
  • James
  • Shannon
  • Kennedy
  • Lewis
  • Bell
  • Strickler
  • Wood
  • Furman
  • J. Davis
  • Shafer
  • Broderick
  • Kline
  • Scranton
  • Singel
  • Schweiker
  • Jubelirer
  • Knoll
  • Scarnati
  • Cawley
Persondata
Name Davis, David J.
Alternative names
Short description American politician
Date of birth 1870
Place of birth
Date of death 1942
Place of death


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Famous quotes containing the words davis and/or david:

    While the light burning within may have been divine, the outer case of the lamp was assuredly cheap enough. Whitman was, from first to last, a boorish, awkward poseur.
    —Rebecca Harding Davis (1831–1910)

    Any moral philosophy is exceedingly rare. This of Menu addresses our privacy more than most. It is a more private and familiar, and at the same time, a more public and universal word, than is spoken in parlor or pulpit nowadays.
    —Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)