Dactylic Hexameter

Dactylic Hexameter

Dactylic hexameter (also known as "heroic hexameter") is a form of meter in poetry or a rhythmic scheme. It is traditionally associated with the quantitative meter of classical epic poetry in both Greek and Latin, and was consequently considered to be the Grand Style of classical poetry. The premier examples of its use are Homer's Iliad and Odyssey and Virgil's Aeneid.

Read more about Dactylic Hexameter:  Structure, Homer’s Meter, Latin Hexameter, Virgil and The Augustan Poets, Silver Age and Later Heroic Verse

Other articles related to "dactylic hexameter, hexameter, dactylic":

Dactylic Hexameter - Silver Age and Later Heroic Verse
... The verse form itself then was little changed, as the quality of a poet's hexameter was judged against the standard set by Virgil and the other ... by adding unusual restrictions to the standard hexameter ... The rhopalic verse of Ausonius is a good example besides following the standard hexameter pattern, each word in the line is one syllable longer than the previous, e.g ...
Metre (poetry) - Metre in Various Languages - Greek and Latin
... The most important Classical metre is the dactylic hexameter, the metre of Homer and Virgil ... The opening line of the Æneid is a typical line of dactylic hexameter Armă vĭ
Dactylic Pentameter
... Dactylic pentameter is a form of meter in poetry ... In modern poetry, a simple form of dactylic pentameter can be seen in Stan Galloway's poem "Angels' First Assignment," the first two lines of which read "Are you still standing ... The meter consists of two halves, both shaped around the dactylic hexameter line up to the main caesura ...