Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood - Further Reading

Further Reading

  • Admiral Collingwood - Nelson's Own Hero, Max Adams, Phoenix, London, 2005, ISBN 0-304-36729-X.
  • The Trafalgar Captains, Colin White and the 1805 Club, Chatham Publishing, London, 2005, ISBN 1-86176-247-X.
  • The Naval Chronicle Volume 15, 1806. J. Gold, London (reissued by Cambridge University Press, 2010. ISBN 978-1-108-01854-8).

Read more about this topic:  Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood

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Famous quotes containing the word reading:

    The words of the Constitution ... are so unrestricted by their intrinsic meaning or by their history or by tradition or by prior decisions that they leave the individual Justice free, if indeed they do not compel him, to gather meaning not from reading the Constitution but from reading life.
    Felix Frankfurter (1882–1965)

    Much reading is an oppression of the mind, and extinguishes the natural candle, which is the reason of so many senseless scholars in the world.
    William Penn (1644–1718)