Cumberland Gap - References in Popular Culture

References in Popular Culture

  • Cumberland Gap has lent its name to a popular folk song recorded and performed by American folk and bluegrass musicians such as Woody Guthrie and Earl Scruggs and British skiffle artists such as Lonnie Donegan and the Vipers Skiffle Group.
  • The gap has been mentioned in many songs, including the Old Crow Medicine Show song "Wagon Wheel" co-written by Bob Dylan and Ketch Secor, the song "The Ballad of Thunder Road", and the song "Mighty Joe Moon" by American band Grant Lee Buffalo.
  • In 1889 a United States Senator voted against having a World's Fair, the fair Chicago's bid eventually won, "and out of sheer cussedness voted for Cumberland Gap" as the proposed site.

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