Cultural Depictions of Vincent Van Gogh

Cultural Depictions Of Vincent Van Gogh

This is a list that shows references made in culture to the life and work of artist Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890).

Read more about Cultural Depictions Of Vincent Van Gogh:  Literature, Film and Television, Theatre, Video Games, Art, Popular Recognition

Famous quotes containing the words vincent van gogh, van gogh, gogh, van, cultural, depictions and/or vincent:

    It is not the language of painters but the language of nature which one should listen to.... The feeling for the things themselves, for reality, is more important than the feeling for pictures.
    Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890)

    The Mediterranean has the color of mackerel, changeable I mean. You don’t always know if it is green or violet, you can’t even say it’s blue, because the next moment the changing reflection has taken on a tint of rose or gray.
    —Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890)

    Those Dutchmen had hardly any imagination or fantasy, but their good taste and their scientific knowledge of composition were enormous.
    —Vincent Van Gogh (1853–1890)

    For him nor deep nor hill there is,
    But all’s one level plain he hunts for flowers.
    —Unknown. The Thousand and One Nights.

    AWP. Anthology of World Poetry, An. Mark Van Doren, ed. (Rev. and enl. Ed., 1936)

    Barbarisation may be defined as a cultural process whereby an attained condition of high value is gradually overrun and superseded by elements of lower quality.
    Johan Huizinga (1872–1945)

    Surely, of all creatures we eat, we are most brutal to snails. Helix optera is dug out of the earth where he has been peacefully enjoying his summer sleep, cracked like an egg, and eaten raw, presumably alive. Or boiled in oil. Or roasted in the hot ashes of a wood fire.... If God is a snail, Bosch’s depictions of Hell are going to look like a vicarage tea-party.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    a long shot at long odds, a black mare
    By Hatred out of Envy by Despair.
    —James Vincent Cunningham (1911–1985)