Crowned Cormorant - Behavior

Behavior

Crowned Cormorants feed on slow-moving fish and invertebrates, which they forage for in shallow coastal waters and among kelp beds.

It builds a nest from kelp, sticks, bones and lines it with kelp or feathers. The nest is usually in an elevated position such as a rocks, trees or man-made structures, but may be built on the ground.

Read more about this topic:  Crowned Cormorant

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