Croatian Jews

Croatian Jews

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The Jewish community of Croatia dates back to at least the 3rd century AD, although little is known of the community until the 10th and 15th centuries. The community, over 20,000 strong on the eve of World War II, was almost entirely destroyed in The Holocaust. After the World War II half of the survivors choose to settle in Israel while some 2,500 live today in Croatia. That number is an estimate and it is believed that the number of Croatian Jews is larger because more than 80 percent of the 1,500 members of Zagreb's Jewish community were either born in mixed marriages or are married to a non-Jew. Many grandchildren of Holocaust survivors have just one Jewish grandparent.

Read more about Croatian Jews:  Today

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Croatian Jews - Regional Communities - Dalmatia
... The Jewish communities of the Croatian coast of Dalmatia date back to the 14th century AD ... increasing persecution in Spain, and then from 1492 as Jews fled the Spanish and Portuguese Inquisitions ... When Dalmatia was occupied by Napoleonic forces, the Jews attained legal equality for the first time ...

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    His Majesty’s Government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object, it being clearly understood that nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non-Jewish communities in Palestine, or the rights and political status enjoyed by Jews in any other country.
    —A.J. (Arthur James)