Crest - in Science

In Science

  • Crest (feathers), the distinctive head plumage exhibited by birds such as cockatoos
  • Comb (anatomy), or Cockscomb
  • Crest (physics), the section of a wave that rises above an undisturbed position
  • Crest factor, a dimensionless number quantifying the shapes of waves
  • Crest (hydrology), the highest level above a certain point (the datum point, or reference point) that a river will reach in a certain amount of time
  • Sagittal crest, a ridge of bone running lengthwise along the midline of the top of the skull of many primate and other mammalian skulls
  • Cresting (Fasciation), in botany, abnormal growth of a plant

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