Crayola Kids Adventures: 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea - Comic Book and Graphic Adaptations

Comic Book and Graphic Adaptations

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea has been adapted into comic book format numerous times.

  • In 1948, Gilberton Publishing published a comic adaptation via issue #47 of their Classics Illustrated series., that was reprinted in 1955, and again in 1968.
  • In 1955, Dell Comics published a comic based on the 1954 film via issue #614 of their Movie Classics line called Walt Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.
  • In 1963, in conjunction with the first nationwide re-release of the film, Gold Key published a comic based on the 1954 film called Walt Disney's 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.
  • In 1973, Pendulum Press published a hardcover illustrated book.
  • In 1974, Power Records published a comic and record set.
  • In 1976, Marvel Comics published a comic book adaptation via issue #4 of their Marvel Classics Comics line.
  • In 1990, Pendulum Press published another comic based on the novel via issue #4 of their Illustrated Stories line.
  • In 1992, Dark Horse Comics published a one shot comic called Dark Horse Classics: 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea #1.
  • In 1997, Acclaim/Valiant published CLASSICS ILLUSTRATED: 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea.
  • In 2008, Sterling Graphics published a pop-up graphic book.
  • In 2009, Flesk Publications published a graphic novel called Twenty-Thousand Leagues Under The Sea.
  • In 2011, Campfire Classic published a trade paperback.

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