Craniofacial

Craniofacial (cranio- combining form meaning head or skull + -facial combining form referring to the facial structures grossly) is a term typically used to describe an area of focus for the study and treatment of certain congenital malformations or facial injuries. According to the Online version of the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the first use of the term was circa 1859. The first pubmed citation with the use of the term Craniofacial was in 1876 by TH Huxley.

Today, the term craniofacial is used to describe an area of expertise where people can subspecialize from various professional backgrounds and interact in multi-disciplinary medical-surgical teams that treat and do research on disorders affecting this region. Organizations with interest in the clinical treatment and management of craniofacial problems exist and bring together basic scientists, geneticists, epidemiologists, molecular and developmental biologists to understand underling causes and mechanisms of normal and abnormal facial development.

Craniofacial surgeons can come from a variety of backgrounds, but most are oral and maxillofacial surgeons, or plastic surgeons who have undertaken subspecialty fellowship training after residency.

Other articles related to "craniofacial":

Craniofacial Prosthesis
... Craniofacial prostheses are prostheses made by individuals trained in anaplastology or maxillofacial prosthodontics who medically help rehabilitate those suffering from facial ... hair prosthesis can also be classified as craniofacial prostheses ... When surgical reconstruction is not ideal, craniofacial prosthetics are favored when they can better restore the form and function of the absent facial ...
Craniofacial Team
... A craniofacial team is a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) which provides multidisciplinary consultations, diagnosis, treatment planning and procedures ... Craniofacial anomalies or syndromes are defined as congenital conditions other than cleft lip/palate, unless cleft lip/palate is a feature of another condition, anomaly or syndrome ...
CRLF1 - Clinical Significance
... by profuse hyperhidrosis in cold environmental temperature and characteristic craniofacial and skeletal features) Crisponi syndrome (CS), characterized by neonatal-onset ... in CRLF1 mutation include marfanoid habitus with progressive kyphoscoliosis and craniofacial characteristics including dolichocephaly, a slender face with poor expression, a nose with hypoplastic nares ...
Winston Patrick Kuo - Research
... He is currently trying to understand craniofacial abnormalities related to bone and cartilage ... Craniofacial abnormalities are some of the most common structural birth defects that are often associated with developmental disabilities ... Impaired cranial bone formation and remodeling can contribute to many of these craniofacial abnormalities such as Apert’s, Crouzon’s, Treacher-Collins, Pierre ...