Cox's Orange Pippin

Cox's Orange Pippin is an apple cultivar first grown in 1825, at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire, England, by the retired brewer and horticulturist Richard Cox. Though the parentage of the cultivar is unknown, Ribston Pippin seems a likely candidate. The variety was introduced for sale by the 1850s by Mr. Charles Turner, and grown commercially from the 1860s, particularly in the Vale of Evesham in Worcestershire, and later in Kent.

Cox's Orange Pippin is highly regarded due to its excellent flavour and attractive appearance. The apples are of medium size, orange-red in colour deepening to bright red and mottled with carmine over a deep yellow background. The flesh is very aromatic, yellow-white, fine-grained, crisp and very juicy. Cox's flavour is sprightly subacid, with hints of cherry and anise, becoming softer and milder with age. When ripe apples are shaken, the seeds make a rattling sound as they are only loosely held in the apple flesh.

One of the best in quality of the English dessert apples; Cox's Orange Pippin may be eaten out of hand or sliced. Not recommended for cooking, it cooks to a fine froth. Cox's Orange Pippin is often blended with other varieties in the production of cider.

According to the Institute of Food Research, Cox's Orange Pippin accounts for over 50% of the UK acreage of dessert apples. The tree is a moderate grower and is annually productive. However it can be difficult to grow in many environments and tends to be susceptible to diseases such as scab, mildew and canker. A testament to this is the fact that it is rarely grown commercially in North America. A number of sports of Cox's Orange Pippin have been discovered over subsequent years and propagated. These retain "Cox" in their names, e.g., Cherry Cox, Crimson Cox, King Cox, Queen Cox. In addition to the cultivation of Cox sports, apple breeders have hybridized Cox with other varieties to improve vigor, disease resistance and yield while attempting to retain the unique qualities of Cox's flavour.

Read more about Cox's Orange PippinDescendent Cultivars

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