Covert Organizations - Representations in Popular Culture

Representations in Popular Culture

Covert operations have often been the subject of popular novels, films, TV series, comics, etc. The Company is a fictional covert organization featured in the American television drama/thriller series Prison Break. Also other series that deal with covert operations are Mission: Impossible, Alias, Burn Notice, The Unit, The State Within, Covert Affairs and 24.

Read more about this topic:  Covert Organizations

Other articles related to "popular, popular culture":

Julia (given Name)
... It was the 10th most popular name for girls born in the United States in 2007 and the 88th most popular name for females in the 1990 census there ... It was the 89th most popular name for girls born in England and Wales in 2007 the 94th most popular name for girls born in Scotland in 2007 the 13th most popular name for girls born in Spain in ...
History Of Belgium - Interwar Period - Art and Culture
... Comic strips became extremely popular in Belgium during the 1930s ... One of the most popular comics of the 20th century, Hergé's The Adventures of Tintin first appeared in 1929 ... The growth of comic strips was also accompanied by a popular art movement, exemplified by Edgar P ...
Wadden Sea - Recreation
... Many of the islands have been popular seaside resorts since the 19th century ... walking on the sandy flats at low tide, has become popular in the Wadden Sea ... It is also a popular region for pleasure boating ...
Forensic Entomology - In Literature
... Early twentieth-century popular scientific literature began to pique a broader interest in entomology ... The very popular ten-volume book series, Alfred Brehem’s Thierleben (Life of Animals, 1876–1879) expounded on many zoological topics, including arthropods ... studies of forensic science and entomology became an established part of Western popular culture, which in turn inspired other scientists to continue and expand upon his research ...

Famous quotes containing the words culture and/or popular:

    Any historian of the literature of the modern age will take virtually for granted the adversary intention, the actually subversive intention, that characterizes modern writing—he will perceive its clear purpose of detaching the reader from the habits of thought and feeling that the larger culture imposes, of giving him a ground and a vantage point from which to judge and condemn, and perhaps revise, the culture that produces him.
    Lionel Trilling (1905–1975)

    Like other secret lovers, many speak mockingly about popular culture to conceal their passion for it.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)