Costume Jewelry

Costume Jewelry

Costume jewelry (also called trinkets, fashion jewelry, junk jewelry, fake jewelry, or fallalery) is jewelry manufactured as ornamentation to complement a particular fashionable costume or garment. Costume jewelry came into being in the 1930s as a cheap, disposable accessory meant to be worn with a specific outfit. It was intended to be fashionable for a short period of time, outdate itself, and then be repurchased to fit with a new outfit or new fashion style. Its main use is in fashion, as opposed to "real" (fine) jewelry which may be regarded primarily as collectibles, keepsakes, or investments. Costume jewelry is made of less valuable materials including base metals, glass, plastic, and synthetic stones; in place of more valuable materials such as precious metals and gems.

Read more about Costume JewelryEtymology, Components, General History, Business and Industry

Other articles related to "costume, jewelry, costume jewelry":

Fashion Jewelry - Components
... Originally, costume or fashion jewelry was made of inexpensive simulated gemstones, such as rhinestones or lucite, set in pewter, silver, nickel or brass ... World War II era, when sterling silver was often incorporated into costume jewelry designs ... This resulted in a number of years during which sterling silver costume jewelry was produced and some can still be found in today's vintage jewelry ...
Costume Jewelry - Business and Industry
... Costume jewelry is considered a discrete category of fashion accessory, and displays many characteristics of a self-contained industry ... Costume jewelry manufacturers are located throughout the world, with a particular concentration in parts of China and India, where entire city-wide and region-wide economies are dominated by the trade of ... the lack of regulations in the manufacture of such jewelry—these range from human rights issues surrounding the treatment of labor, to the use of manufacturing processes in which small, but potentially harmful ...
Fashion Jewelry
... Costume jewelry (also called trinkets, fashion jewelry, junk jewelry, fake jewelry, or fallalery) is jewelry manufactured as ornamentation to complement a particular ... Costume jewelry came into being in the 1930s as a cheap, disposable accessory meant to be worn with a specific outfit ... Its main use is in fashion, as opposed to "real" (fine) jewelry which may be regarded primarily as collectibles, keepsakes, or investments ...
Speidel - History
... to establish a branch of the family’s jewelry chain manufacturing business ... During the 1920s, costume jewelry and watchbands were added to the line ... A planned reduction of costume jewelry production was soon instituted, leading to the discontinuation of costume jewelry in the early 50’s ...
Fashion Jewelry - Business and Industry
... Costume jewelry is considered a discrete category of fashion accessory, and displays many characteristics of a self-contained industry ... Costume jewelry manufacturers are located throughout the world, with a particular concentration in parts of China and India, where entire city-wide and region-wide economies are ... in the United States and elsewhere about the lack of regulations in the manufacture of such jewelry—these range from human rights issues surrounding the treatment of labor, to the use of manufacturing processes in ...

Famous quotes containing the words jewelry and/or costume:

    The demonstrations are always early in the morning, at six o’clock. It’s wonderful, because I’m not doing anything at six anyway, so why not demonstrate?... When you’ve written to your president, to your congressman, to your senator and nothing, nothing has come of it, you take to the streets.
    Erica Bouza, U.S. jewelry designer and social activist. As quoted in The Great Divide, book 2, section 7, by Studs Terkel (1988)

    My neighbors tell me of their adventures with famous gentlemen and ladies, what notabilities they met at the dinner-table; but I am no more interested in such things than in the contents of the Daily Times. The interest and the conversation are about costume and manners chiefly; but a goose is a goose still, dress it as you will.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)