Context Sensitive

Some articles on context sensitive, context, contexts:

Context-sensitive User Interface
... A context sensitive user interface is one which can automatically choose from a multiplicity of options based on the current or previous state(s) of the program operation.Context sensitivity is almost ... Context sensitivity, when operating correctly, should be practically transparent to the user ... The user-interface may also provide Context sensitive feedback, such as changing the appearance of the mouse pointer or cursor, changing the menu color, or with applicable ...
Context-sensitive Solutions (transport)
... Context-sensitive solutions (CSS) is a theoretical and practical approach to transportation decision-making and design that takes into consideration the communities and lands ... The term is closely related to but distinguishable from context-sensitive design in that it asserts that all decisions in transportation planning, project development, operations ... In transit projects, CSS generally refers to context sensitive planning, design, and development around transit stations, also known as transit-oriented development (TOD) ...
Contextualism - Epistemology - Introduction
... contextualism is the treatment of the word 'knows' as context-sensitive ... Context-sensitive expressions are ones that "express different propositions relative to different contexts of use" ... For example, some terms that are relatively uncontroversially considered context-sensitive are indexicals, such 'I', 'here', and 'now' ...

Famous quotes containing the words sensitive and/or context:

    We are sensitive to good or ill fortune only in proportion to our self-love.
    François, Duc De La Rochefoucauld (1613–1680)

    Parents are led to believe that they must be consistent, that is, always respond to the same issue the same way. Consistency is good up to a point but your child also needs to understand context and subtlety . . . much of adult life is governed by context: what is appropriate in one setting is not appropriate in another; the way something is said may be more important than what is said. . . .
    Stanley I. Greenspan (20th century)