Computer Engineering - Education

Education

Most entry-level computer engineering jobs have require at least a bachelor's degree in computer engineering. Sometimes a degree in electrical engineering is accepted, due to the similarity of the two fields. According to BLS, "a computer engineering major is similar to electrical engineering but with some computer science courses added to the curriculum". Some large firms or specialized jobs require a master's degree. It is also important for Computer Engineers to keep up with rapid advances in technology. Therefore, many continue learning throughout their careers.

Read more about this topic:  Computer Engineering

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Famous quotes containing the word education:

    We have not been fair with the Negro and his education. He has not had adequate or ample education to permit him to qualify for many jobs that are open to him.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)

    It is not every man who can be a Christian, even in a very moderate sense, whatever education you give him. It is a matter of constitution and temperament, after all. He may have to be born again many times. I have known many a man who pretended to be a Christian, in whom it was ridiculous, for he had no genius for it. It is not every man who can be a free man, even.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    One is rarely an impulsive innovator after the age of sixty, but one can still be a very fine orderly and inventive thinker. One rarely procreates children at that age, but one is all the more skilled at educating those who have already been procreated, and education is procreation of another kind.
    —G.C. (Georg Christoph)