Complex Event Processing - Example

Example

A more systemic example of CEP involves a car, some sensors and various events and reactions. Imagine that a car has several sensors—one that measures tire pressure, one that measures speed, and one that detects if someone sits on a seat or leaves a seat.

In the first situation, the car is moving and the pressure of one of the tires moves from 45 psi (pound per square inch) to 41 psi over 15 minutes. As the pressure in the tire is decreasing, a series of events containing the tire pressure is generated. In addition, a series of events containing the speed of the car is generated. The car's Event Processor may detect a situation whereby a loss of tire pressure over a relatively long period of time results in the creation of the "lossOfTirePressure" event. This new event may trigger a reaction process to note the pressure loss into the car's maintenance log, and alert the driver via the car's portal that the tire pressure has reduced.

In the second situation, the car is moving and the pressure of one of the tires drops from 45 psi to 20 psi in 5 seconds. A different situation is detected—perhaps because the loss of pressure occurred over a shorter period of time, or perhaps because the difference in values between each event were larger than a predefined limit. The different situation results in a new event "blowOutTire" being generated. This new event triggers a different reaction process to immediately alert the driver and to initiate onboard computer routines to assist the driver in bringing the car to a stop without losing control through skidding.

In addition, events that represent detected situations can also be combined with other events in order to detect more complex situations. For example, in the final situation the car was moving normally but suffers a blown tire which results in the car leaving the road and striking a tree and the driver is thrown from the car. A series of different situations are rapidly detected. The combination of "blowOutTire", "zeroSpeed" and "driverLeftSeat" within a very short space of time results in a new situation being detected: "occupantThrownAccident". Even though there is no direct measurement that can determine conclusively that the driver was thrown, or that there was an accident, the combination of events allows the situation to be detected and a new event to be created to signify the detected situation. This is the essence of a complex (or composite) event. It is complex because one cannot directly detect the situation; one has to infer or deduce that the situation has occurred from a combination of other events.

Read more about this topic:  Complex Event Processing

Other articles related to "example":

Wave Front Set - Definition - Example
... Then the projection on the first component of a distribution's wave front set is nothing else than its classical singular support, i.e ... the complement of the set on which its restriction would be a smooth function ...
Example

Example may also refer to:

  • Example (musician), a British musician
  • Example, Florida rock band For Squirrels' sole major-label album, released in 1995
  • example.com, example.net, example.org, example.edu and .example, domain names reserved for use in documentation as examples
  • HMS Example (P165), an Archer-class patrol and training vessel of the British Royal Navy
  • The Example, a 1634 play by James Shirley
  • The Example (comics), a 2009 graphic novel by Tom Taylor and Colin Wilson
Finite Model Theory - Basic Challenges - Characterisation of A Class of Structures - Example
4 ... Next we have to scale the structures up by increasing m ...

Famous quotes containing the word example:

    Our intellect is not the most subtle, the most powerful, the most appropriate, instrument for revealing the truth. It is life that, little by little, example by example, permits us to see that what is most important to our heart, or to our mind, is learned not by reasoning but through other agencies. Then it is that the intellect, observing their superiority, abdicates its control to them upon reasoned grounds and agrees to become their collaborator and lackey.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)