Comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP

This page is a comparison of Windows Vista and Windows XP. Windows XP and Windows Vista differ considerably in regards to their security architecture, networking technologies, management and administration, shell & user interface, and mobile computing. Windows XP has suffered criticism for security problems and issues with performance. Vista has received criticism for issues with performance and product activation. Another common criticism of Vista concerns the integration of new forms of digital rights management (DRM) into the operating system, and User Account Control (UAC) security technology.

Read more about Comparison Of Windows Vista And Windows XPCompatibility, Performance, Security

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Comparison Of Windows Vista And Windows XP - Shell and User Interface - Visual Styles
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