Common Sense Ideas For A More Profitable Affiliate Program

Famous quotes containing the words affiliate, program, profitable, common, sense and/or ideas:

    Reporters for tabloid newspapers beat a path to the park entrance each summer when the national convention of nudists is held, but the cult’s requirement that visitors disrobe is an obstacle to complete coverage of nudist news. Local residents interested in the nudist movement but as yet unwilling to affiliate make observations from rowboats in Great Egg Harbor River.
    —For the State of New Jersey, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Navajo men and boys have an odd way of showing their friendship. When two young men meet at the trading post, a “Sing”, or a dance they greet each other, inquire about the health of their respective families, then stand silently some ten or fifteen minutes while one feels the other’s arms, shoulders, and chest.
    —Administration in the State of Ariz, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    On the most profitable lie, the course of events presently lays a destructive tax; whilst frankness invites frankness, puts the parties on a convenient footing, and makes their business a friendship.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Theodotus: Caesar: once in ten generations of men, the world gains an immortal book. Caesar: If it did not flatter mankind, the common executioner would burn it.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    This teaching is not practical in the sense in which the New Testament is. It is not always sound sense in practice. The Brahman never proposes courageously to assault evil, but patiently to starve it out. His active faculties are paralyzed by the idea of caste, of impassable limits of destiny and the tyranny of time.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Public morning diversions were the last dissipating habit she obtained; but when that was accomplished, her time was squandered away, the power of reflection was lost, [and] her ideas were all centered in dress, drums, routs, operas, masquerades, and every kind of public diversion. Visionary schemes of pleasure were continually present to her imagination, and her brain was whirled about by such a dizziness that she might properly be said to labor under the distemper called the vertigo.
    Sarah Fielding (1710–1768)