Commercial Traffic

Some articles on commercial, commercial traffic, traffic:

Federal Bridge Gross Weight Formula - Usage
... The formula was enacted as law to limit the weight-to-length ratio of a commercial motor vehicle (CMV) ... the length, width, and weight limits of CMVs for interstate commercial traffic ... Interstate commercial traffic is generally limited to a network of Interstate Highways, U.S ...
River Avon (Warwickshire) - Commercial Traffic
... Commercial traffic returned to the Avon in May 2010, as part of a scheme to build flood defences at the town of Pershore, following flooding in 2007, which caused ...
Dipolog Airport - History - Commercial Traffic
... The airport's commercial viability for growth was established as more flights were mounted by Philippine Airlines prompting the national government to introduce further development ... In 2002, at least 25% of the passenger traffic bound for Dipolog Airport are composed of foreign tourists ... In December 2006, it registered a maximum traffic of 330 daily passengers on several occasions based on the aircraft's available capacity serving the route with Philippine Airlines utilizing the much bigger ...
Trucking Industry In The United States - Rules and Regulations - Weight, Size, and Route Restrictions
... width, and weight limits of CMVs for interstate commercial traffic ... Interstate commercial traffic is generally limited a network of interstate freeways, U.S ... than federal limits) come into effect for intrastate commercial traffic, provided the vehicle is not on the NN ...

Famous quotes containing the words traffic and/or commercial:

    Irony, forsooth! Guard yourself, Engineer, from the sort of irony that thrives up here; guard yourself altogether from taking on their mental attitude! Where irony is not a direct and classic device of oratory, not for a moment equivocal to a healthy mind, it makes for depravity, it becomes a drawback to civilization, an unclean traffic with the forces of reaction, vice and materialism.
    Thomas Mann (1875–1955)

    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    J. Ellen Foster (1840–1910)