Comedy - Studies On The Theory of The Comic

Studies On The Theory of The Comic

The phenomena connected with laughter and that which provokes it have been carefully investigated by psychologists. They agreed the predominant characteristics are incongruity or contrast in the object and shock or emotional seizure on the part of the subject. It has also been held that the feeling of superiority is an essential factor: thus Thomas Hobbes speaks of laughter as a "sudden glory". Modern investigators have paid much attention to the origin both of laughter and of smiling, as well as the development of the "play instinct" and its emotional expression.

George Meredith, Essay on Comedy, said that "One excellent test of the civilization of a country ... I take to be the flourishing of the Comic idea and Comedy; and the test of true Comedy is that it shall awaken thoughtful laughter." Laughter is said to be the cure to being sick. Studies show that people who laugh more often get sick less.

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Other articles related to "studies on the theory of the comic, of the comic, studies":

Gagman - Studies On The Theory of The Comic
... I take to be the flourishing of the Comic idea and Comedy and the test of true Comedy is that it shall awaken thoughtful laughter." Laughter is said to be the cure to being sick ... Studies show that people who laugh more often get sick less ...

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