Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill

The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP), often referred to as the birth-control pill or colloquially as "the Pill", is a birth control method that includes a combination of an estrogen (estradiol) and a progestogen (progestin). When taken by mouth every day, these pills inhibit female fertility. They were first approved for contraceptive use in the United States in 1960, and are a very popular form of birth control. They are currently used by more than 100 million women worldwide and by almost 12 million women in the United States. Usage varies widely by country, age, education, and marital status: one third of women aged 16–49 in the United Kingdom currently use either the combined pill or a progestogen-only "minipill", compared to only 1% of women in Japan.

Read more about Combined Oral Contraceptive PillMedical Use, Drug Interactions, Common Side Effects, Serious Side Effects, Contraindications, Mechanism of Action, Formulations, History, Society and Culture, Environmental Impact

Other articles related to "combined oral contraceptive pill, contraceptive":

Combined Oral Contraceptive Pill - Environmental Impact
... Other forms of contraception, such as the contraceptive patch, use the same synthetic estrogen (EE2) that is found in COCPs, and can add to the hormonal concentration in the water ...

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