Coconut Crabs

Some articles on coconut crab, crab, coconut, crabs, coconut crabs:

Coconut Crab
... The coconut crab, Birgus latro, is a species of terrestrial hermit crab, also known as the robber crab or palm thief ... parts of the Pacific Ocean as far east as the Gambier Islands, mirroring the distribution of the coconut palm it has been extirpated from most areas with a ... The coconut crab is the only species of the genus Birgus, and is related to the terrestrial hermit crabs of the genus Coenobita ...
Coconut Crab - Distribution
... Coconut crabs live in the Indian Ocean and the central Pacific Ocean, with a distribution that closely matches that of the coconut palm ... There is evidence that the coconut crab once lived on the mainlands of Australia and Madagascar and on the island of Mauritius, but it no longer occurs in any of these ... As they cannot swim as adults, coconut crabs must have colonised the islands as planktonic larvae ...
Coconut Crab - Description - Respiration
... Except as larvae, coconut crabs cannot swim, and they will drown if left in water for more than an hour ... stage between gills and lungs, and is one of the most significant adaptations of the coconut crab to its habitat ... Coconut crabs use their hindmost, smallest pair of legs to clean these breathing organs and to moisten them with water ...
Coconut Crab - Ecology - Habitat
... Coconut crabs are considered one of the most terrestrial decapods, with most aspects of its life linked to a terrestrial existence they will drown in sea water in less than a day ... Coconut crabs live alone in underground burrows and rock crevices, depending on the local terrain ... The coconut crabs' burrows contain very fine yet strong fibres of the coconut husk which the animal uses as bedding ...

Famous quotes containing the word crabs:

    Baltimore lay very near the immense protein factory of Chesapeake Bay, and out of the bay it ate divinely. I well recall the time when prime hard crabs of the channel species, blue in color, at least eight inches in length along the shell, and with snow-white meat almost as firm as soap, were hawked in Hollins Street of Summer mornings at ten cents a dozen.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)