Clytemnestra

Clytemnestra or Clytaemnestra (pronounced /ˌklaɪtəmˈniːstrə/; Greek: Κλυταιμνήστρα, ), in ancient Greek legend, was the wife of Agamemnon, king of the Ancient Greek kingdom of Mycenae or Argos. In the Oresteia by Aeschylus, she was a femme fatale who murdered her husband, Agamemnon – said by Euripides to be her second husband – and the Trojan princess Cassandra, whom he had taken as war prize following the sack of Troy; however, in Homer's Odyssey, her role in Agamemnon's death is unclear and her character is significantly more subdued.

The name form Κλυταιμνήστρα (Klytaimnēstra) is commonly glossed as "famed for her suitors". However, this form is a later misreading motivated by an erroneous etymological connection to the verb μνάoμαι 'woo, court'. The original name form is believed to have been Κλυταιμήστρα (Klytaimēstra), without the -mn-, and the modern form with -mn- does not occur before the middle Byzantine period. Aeschylus, in certain wordplays on her name, appears to assume an etymological link with the verb μήδoμαι, 'scheme, contrive'.

Read more about Clytemnestra:  Background, Mythology

Other articles related to "clytemnestra":

Oresteia (opera) - Roles
... Conductor - ) Agamemnon, king of Argos bass Clytemnestra, his wife alto Aegisthus, his first cousin baritone Cassandra, a Trojan prisoner soprano A ... Part 2 Female servants of Clytemnestra ...
The Travelling Players - Plot
... against the Germans, and is executed by them after being betrayed by Clytemnestra and Aegisthos ... Aegisthos, Clytemnestra's lover, is an informer and collaborator working with the German occupiers ... Orestes, son of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra, fights on the side of the leftists, avenges his father's death by killing his mother and Aegisthos ...
Clytemnestra - Mythology
... Agamemnon persuaded Clytemnestra to send Iphigenia by deceptively telling her that the purpose of his daughter's visit was to marry her to Achilles ... Clytemnestra learned of this event and grieved for her daughter ... During this period of Agamemnon's long absence, Clytemnestra began a love affair with Aegisthus, her husband's cousin ...
The Flies - Compared To The Oresteia
... play, Agamemnon, with the mention of Agamemnon’s death by Clytemnestra and Aegisthus ... of the main themes throughout the play, Sartre’s Orestes does not kill Aegisthus and Clytemnestra for vengeance or because it was his destiny, instead it is for the sake of the people of Argos, so that they may be ... Sartre even diminishes the character of Clytemnestra so that there is much less emphasis on matricide than there is in the version by Aeschylus ...
Iphigenia In Aulis - Plot
... Clytemnestra never receives it, however, because it is intercepted by Menelaus, Agamemnon's brother, who is enraged over his change of heart ... By this time, Clytemnestra is already on her way to Aulis with Iphigenia and her baby brother Orestes, making the decision of how to proceed all the more difficult ... Clytemnestra and Iphigenia try in vain to persuade Agamemnon to change his mind, but the general believes that he has no choice ...