Climate of Ohio - Education

Education

Ohio's system of public education is outlined in Article VI of the state constitution, and in Title XXXIII of the Ohio Revised Code. Substantively, Ohio's system is similar to those found in other states. At the State level, the Ohio Department of Education, which is overseen by the Ohio State Board of Education, governs primary and secondary educational institutions. At the municipal level, there are approximately 700 school districts statewide. The Ohio Board of Regents coordinates and assists with Ohio's institutions of higher education which have recently been reorganized into the University System of Ohio under Governor Strickland. The system averages an annual enrollment of over 400,000 students, making it one of the five largest state university systems in the U.S.

Read more about this topic:  Climate Of Ohio

Other articles related to "education":

Fort Wayne, Indiana - Infrastructure - Education - Libraries
... In 1997, Places Rated Almanac recognized Fort Wayne as having the highest reading quotient of any place in North America, due in part to the city's quality library system. ...
Internationalization (Globalization and Education)
... Education is becoming increasingly international ... promoted the global rules and norms of how the school should operate and what is education ... Programs such as the International Baccalaureate have contributed to the internationalization of education ...
Yaroslavl - Education
... Amongst the non-state funded institutions for further education in the city is the International Academy for Business and New Technologies (MUBiNT), and also a number of branches from Moscow-base ...
Queens' College, Cambridge - Education At Queens'
... academic disciplines, except the combination of Education with English and Drama ... As in all other Cambridge colleges, undergraduate education is based on the tutorial system ...

Famous quotes containing the word education:

    If we help an educated man’s daughter to go to Cambridge are we not forcing her to think not about education but about war?—not how she can learn, but how she can fight in order that she might win the same advantages as her brothers?
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    What does education often do? It makes a straight-cut ditch of a free, meandering brook.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The principle goal of education in the schools should be creating men and women who are capable of doing new things, not simply repeating what other generations have done; men and women who are creative, inventive and discoverers, who can be critical and verify, and not accept, everything they are offered.
    Jean Piaget (1896–1980)