Claudication

Claudication, literally 'limping' (Latin), is a medical term usually referring to impairment in walking, or pain, discomfort or tiredness in the legs that occurs during walking and is relieved by rest. The perceived level of pain from claudication can be mild to extremely severe. Claudication is most common in the calves but it can also affect the feet, thighs, hips, buttocks, or arms. The word "claudication" comes from the Latin "claudicare" meaning to limp.

Claudication that appears after a short amount of walking may sometimes be described by US medical professionals by the number of typical city street blocks the patient can walk before the onset of claudication. Thus, "one-block claudication" refers to claudication that appears after walking one block, "two-block claudication" appears after walking two blocks, etc.

Read more about Claudication:  Differential Diagnosis, Prognosis, Treatment

Other articles related to "claudication":

Claudication - Treatment
... to treat the effects of the vasoconstriction associated with claudication ... name pletaal) is FDA approved for intermittent claudication ...
Intermittent Claudication
... Intermittent claudication (Latin claudicatio intermittens) is a clinical diagnosis given for muscle pain (ache, cramp, numbness or sense of fatigue), classically in the calf ... Claudication derives from the Latin verb claudicare, "to limp" ...
Peripheral Vascular Disease - Treatment
... Regular exercise for those with claudication helps open up alternative small vessels (collateral flow) and the limitation in walking often improves ... Cilostazol or pentoxifylline treatment to relieve symptoms of claudication ... use of percutaneous balloon angioplasty or stenting in patients with intermittent claudication" ...
Neurogenic Claudication
... Neurogenic claudication (NC) is a common symptom of lumbar spinal stenosis, or inflammation of the nerves emanating from the spinal cord ... Neurogenic means that the problem originates with a problem at a nerve, and claudication, from the Latin for limp, because the patient feels a painful cramping or weakness ... NC should therefore be distinguished from vascular claudication, which is when the claudication stems from a circulatory problem, not a neural problem ...
Peripheral Vascular Disease - Prognosis
... There is a low risk that an individual with claudication will develop severe ischemia and require amputation, but the risk of death from coronary events is three to four times ... Of patients with intermittent claudication, only "7% will undergo lower extremity bypass surgery, 4% major amputations, and 16% worsening claudication ...