Clarissa Dickson Wright - Cooking and Television Career

Cooking and Television Career

Seven months after leaving Promis, Dickson Wright offered to run Books For Cooks, a shop and cafe in Portobello Road, London, for the shop's owner. After seven years, the owner decided to sell the shop, and as Dickson Wright did not have the money to buy it she was sacked. She then moved to Edinburgh and ran the Cooks Book Shop.

During her time in Edinburgh, television producer Patricia Llewellyn asked her and Jennifer Paterson if they wanted to make a television programme; they made a pilot in autumn 1994. After the pilot, BBC2 commissioned a series of Two Fat Ladies. Three successful series were made and shown around the world. Paterson died in 1999 mid-way through the fourth series.

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