Clandestine HUMINT and Covert Action

Clandestine HUMINT And Covert Action

National governments deal in both intelligence and military special operations functions that either should be completely secret (i.e., clandestine: the existence of which is not known outside the relevant government circles), or simply cannot be linked to the sponsor (i.e., covert: it is known that sabotage is taking place, but its sponsor is unknown). It is a continuing and unsolved question for governments whether clandestine intelligence collection and covert action should be under the same agency. The arguments for doing so include having centralized functions for monitoring covert action and clandestine HUMINT and making sure they do not conflict, as well as avoiding duplication in common services such as cover identity support, counterespionage, and secret communications. The arguments against doing so suggest that the management of the two activities takes a quite different mindset and skills, in part because clandestine collection almost always is on a slower timeline than covert action.

Read more about Clandestine HUMINT And Covert ActionHistorical Background, Surging Additional Capability For The Second World War, Separate Functions During Peacetime?, Controversies Remain, Current Operations

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Clandestine HUMINT And Covert Action - Current Operations - French Operations
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