Civil Rights Movement

The civil rights movement was a worldwide political movement for equality before the law occurring between approximately 1950 and 1980. In many situations it took the form of campaigns of civil resistance aimed at achieving change by nonviolent forms of resistance. In some situations it was accompanied, or followed, by civil unrest and armed rebellion. The process was long and tenuous in many countries, and many of these movements did not fully achieve their goals although, the efforts of these movements did lead to improvements in the legal rights of previously oppressed groups of people.

Read more about Civil Rights MovementCivil Rights Movement in Northern Ireland, Independence Movements in Africa, Canada's Quiet Revolution, Civil Rights Movement in The United States, LGBT Rights and Gay Liberation, German Student Movement, France 1968, Tlatelolco Massacre, Mexico, Prague Spring, 1967 Australian Referendum

Other articles related to "civil rights movement, civil rights, movement, rights":

Laissez-faire Racism - Jim Crow
... declined during the twentieth century, in part due to the Civil Rights movement that challenged the notions of the biological inferiority of blacks ... Laissez-faire racism of the post civil rights era was formed through the successes of that movement, including the rejection of outright racist discourse ... Political sentiment toward the Civil Rights movement, predominantly the Civil Rights Act of 1964, relied on a particular interpretation of liberal theory ...
Cordell Reagon
... Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and a leader of the Albany Movement during the 1960s Civil Rights Movement ... Cordell Reagon was just 16 in 1959 when he emerged as a leader of the civil rights movement in Albany, Georgia ... secretary of SNCC, called him "the baby of the movement." Reagon, who was arrested more than thirty times in the South for his anti-segregation activities ...
List Of Segregationists During The American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968)
... This is a list of segregationists during the American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968) ... in the South, defended compulsory racial segregation as an institution during the Civil Rights Movement, and many others did not condemn it ... from South Carolina (Democrat, States' Rights Democrat, Republican) Ned Touchstone, Louisiana journalist and printer (Democrat) Joe D ...
Black Power - Impact - Impact On Black Politics
... Though the Black Power movement did not immediately remedy the political problems faced by African Americans in the 1960s and 1970s, the movement did contribute to ... As a contemporary of and successor to the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power movement created, what sociologist Herbert H ... Though the nature of the relationship between the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power movement is contested, Haines’ study of the relationship between black radicals and the mainstream ...

Famous quotes containing the words civil rights, movement, civil and/or rights:

    ...I was confronted with a virile idealism, an awareness of what man must have for manliness, dignity, and inner liberty which, by contrast, made me see how easy living had made my own group into childishly unthinking people. The Negro’s struggles and despairs have been like fertilizer in the fields of his humanity, while we, like protected children with all our basic needs supplied, have given our attention to superficialities.
    Sarah Patton Boyle, U.S. civil rights activist and author. The Desegregated Heart, part 1, ch. 19 (1962)

    ... contemporary black women felt they were asked to choose between a black movement that primarily served the interests of black male patriarchs and a women’s movement which primarily served the interests of racist white women.
    bell hooks (b. c. 1955)

    Men are qualified for civil liberty in exact proportion to their disposition to put moral chains upon their own appetites; in proportion as their love to justice is above their rapacity; in proportion as their soundness and sobriety of understanding is above their vanity and presumption; in proportion as they are more disposed to listen to the counsels of the wise and good, in preference to the flattery of knaves.
    Edmund Burke (1729–1797)

    Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)