Civic Journalism

Civic journalism (also known as public journalism) is the idea of integrating journalism into the democratic process. The media not only informs the public, but it also works towards engaging citizens and creating public debate. The civic journalism movement is, according to professor David K. Perry of the University of Alabama, an attempt to abandon the notion that journalists and their audiences are spectators in political and social processes. In its place, the civic journalism movement seeks to treat readers and community members as participants. With a small but committed following, civic journalism has become as much of a philosophy as it is a practice.

Read more about Civic JournalismHistory, Definition, Main Tenets, Structure, Key Proponents of Civic Journalism, Case Studies

Other articles related to "civic journalism, civic, journalism":

Civic Journalism - Case Studies
... was one newspaper’s attempt to facilitate civic conversation within the diverse city of Philadelphia ... newspaper, KUOW-FM radio station and the Pew Center for Civic Journalism ... communities through news coverage that focuses on citizens’ concerns, encourages civic participation, improves public deliberation and reconnects citizens, candidates and reporters to community life ...
The Wichita Eagle - Introduction of Civic Journalism
... one of the earliest and most vocal proponents of civic journalism (also known as public journalism) which believes that journalists and their audiences are not merely spectators in political and social ... (see Objectivity in Journalism) Instead, the civic journalism movement seeks to treat readers and community members as participants ... With a small, but growing following, civic journalism has become as much of an ideology as it is a practice ...

Famous quotes containing the words journalism and/or civic:

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