City of Frankston - History

History

The City of Frankston was created in 1994 out of the remains of three abolished councils — all but the suburb of Mount Eliza from the former City of Frankston; the suburbs of Carrum Downs, Langwarrin and Skye from the City of Cranbourne; and part of Carrum Downs from the City of Springvale.

The major part of the City was first incorporated in 1860 as the Mornington Roads District, which became a shire in 1871 and was renamed Shire of Frankston and Hastings in 1893, losing its western riding to form the Shire of Mornington, which has since been amalgamated into the Shire of Mornington Peninsula. On 19 October 1960, the Shire of Frankston and Hastings split in two, with the western part remaining as the Shire of Frankston, and the eastern part being incorporated as the Shire of Hastings.

Frankston was officially proclaimed as a City on 24 August 1966.

In 1993, Jeff Kennett and his Local Government Minister, Roger Hallam, announced a major statewide program of local government amalgamations, most of which took effect on 15 December 1994. Most councils were abolished with new ones being created to replace them.

Some changes occurred between the release of the Local Government Board report in July and the actual amalgamation - the original plan was to merge with the City of Chelsea and take Braeside and Carrum Downs from the City of Springvale. However, Frankston City Council submitted that it should expand eastwards instead, as well as taking Mount Eliza and Baxter. By October, the present boundaries had been agreed upon, but the new entity was to be known as the City of Nepean. This appeared in the Board's final report in November 1994. However, the State Government ultimately decided to use the old name for the new entity, departing from the Board's recommendation.

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