Citrate

A citrate can refer either to the conjugate base of citric acid, (C3H5O(COO)33−), or to the esters of citric acid. An example of the former, a salt is trisodium citrate; an ester is triethyl citrate.

Read more about Citrate:  Other Citric Acid Ions, Acidity, Buffering, Chelating, Metabolism, Fatty Acid Synthesis

Other articles related to "citrate":

Citrate (Re)-synthase
... In enzymology, a citrate (Re)-synthase (EC 2.3.3.3) is an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reaction acetyl-CoA + H2O + oxaloacetate citrate + CoA The 3 substrates of this enzyme are acetyl-CoA, H2O, and ... Other names in common use include (R)-citrate synthase, Re-citrate-synthase, and citrate oxaloacetate-lyase ...
Citrate - Fatty Acid Synthesis - Role in Glycolysis
... High concentrations of cytosolic citrate can inhibit phosphofructokinase, catalyst of one of the rate-limiting steps of glycolysis ...
ATP Citrate Lyase - Function
... ATP citrate lyase is the primary enzyme responsible for the synthesis of cytosolic acetyl-CoA in many tissues ... ATP-citrate lyase is also responsible for catalyzing the conversion of citrate and CoA into acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate, along with the hydrolysis of ATP ...
Magnesium Citrate - Mechanism of Action
... Magnesium citrate works by attracting water through the tissues by a process known as osmosis ... Magnesium citrate functions best on an empty stomach, and should always be followed with a full (eight ounce) glass of water or juice to help the magnesium citrate absorb properly and help ... Magnesium citrate is generally not a harmful substance, but care should be taken by consulting a health-care professional if any adverse health problems are suspected or experienced ...
Sodium Citrate
... Sodium citrate may refer to any of the sodium salts of citric acid (though most commonly the third) Monosodium citrate Disodium citrate Trisodium citrate As food additives, the 3 ...