Citadel of Saigon

The Citadel of Saigon (Vietnamese: Thành Sài Gòn ) also known as the Citadel of Gia Dinh (Vietnamese: Thành Gia Định ) was a late 18th century fortress that stood in Saigon (also known in the 19th century as Gia Dinh, now Ho Chi Minh City), Vietnam from its construction in 1790 until its destruction in February 1859. It was destroyed in a French naval bombardment as part of the colonisation of southern Vietnam which became the French colony of Cochinchina. The citadel was only used once prior to its destruction, when it was captured by Le Van Khoi in 1833 and used in a revolt against Emperor Minh Mang.

In the late 18th century, the city of Saigon was the subject of warfare between the Tay Son Dynasty, which had toppled the Nguyen lords who ruled southern Vietnam, and Nguyen Anh, the nephew of the last Nguyen lord. The city changed hands multiple times before Nguyen Anh captured the city in 1789. Under the directions of French officers recruited for him, a Vauban style "octagonal" citadel was built in 1790. Thereafter, the Tay Son never attacked southern Vietnam again, and the military protection allowed Nguyen Anh to get a foothold in the region. He used this to build an administration and strengthen his forces for a campaign that united Vietnam in 1802, resulting in his coronation as Gia Long.

In 1833, his son Minh Mang was faced with a rebellion led by Le Van Khoi, which started after the tomb of Khoi's father Le Van Duyet was desecrated by imperial officials. The rebels took control of the citadel and the revolt continued until the imperial forces took control of the citadel in 1835. Following the capture of the citadel, Minh Mang ordered its razing and replacement with a smaller square stone-built structure, that was more vulnerable to attacks. On February 17, 1859, the citadel was captured during the French invasion after less than a day of battle and significant amounts of military supplies were seized. Realising that they did not have the capacity to hold the fort against Vietnamese attempts to recapture it, the French razed it with explosives, before withdrawing their troops.

Read more about Citadel Of Saigon:  Background, Construction, First Structure, Impact On The Tay Son and The Nguyen, Le Van Khoi Revolt, Second Structure, French Invasion and Destruction

Other articles related to "citadel of saigon, of saigon, saigon":

Citadel Of Saigon - French Invasion and Destruction
... Main article Siege of Saigon The process of Vietnam's colonisation began in 1858 when a Franco-Spanish force landed at Da Nang in central Vietnam and attempted to proceed to ... down, they sailed to the less defended south, targeting Saigon ... They then sailed along the Saigon River to the mouth of the Citadel of Saigon and opened fire with naval artillery from close range ...

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