Choosing A College Degree Can Impact Career Opportunities

Famous quotes containing the words choosing a, career, impact, choosing, college and/or degree:

    Let him be great, and love shall follow him. Nothing is more deeply punished than the neglect of the affinities by which alone society should be formed, and the insane levity of choosing associates by others’ eyes.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Each of the professions means a prejudice. The necessity for a career forces every one to take sides. We live in the age of the overworked, and the under-educated; the age in which people are so industrious that they become absolutely stupid.
    Oscar Wilde (1854–1900)

    One can describe a landscape in many different words and sentences, but one would not normally cut up a picture of a landscape and rearrange it in different patterns in order to describe it in different ways. Because a photograph is not composed of discrete units strung out in a linear row of meaningful pieces, we do not understand it by looking at one element after another in a set sequence. The photograph is understood in one act of seeing; it is perceived in a gestalt.
    Joshua Meyrowitz, U.S. educator, media critic. “The Blurring of Public and Private Behaviors,” No Sense of Place: The Impact of Electronic Media on Social Behavior, Oxford University Press (1985)

    Although I’ve risen! and my back is bold.
    My tongue is brainy, choosing from among
    Care, rage, surprise, despair, and choosing care.
    I’m semi-splendid within what I’ve defended.
    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)

    A whale-ship was my Yale College and my Harvard.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    The real essence, the internal qualities, and constitution of even the meanest object, is hid from our view; something there is in every drop of water, every grain of sand, which it is beyond the power of human understanding to fathom or comprehend. But it is evident ... that we are influenced by false principles to that degree as to mistrust our senses, and think we know nothing of those things which we perfectly comprehend.
    George Berkeley (1685–1753)