Chocolate Spread


Chocolate spread is a chocolate-flavoured paste which is eaten mostly spread on breads and toasts or similar pastries such as muffins and pitas.

Chocolate spread is a product often favored by children and serves as a prevalent spread on their sandwiches. Some adults enjoy chocolate spread sandwiches as a comfort food.

Although it tastes, smells, and looks like chocolate it does not solidify. The paste usually contains cocoa and oil, and is also likely to contain milk and additional taste and smell components. At times it also includes nuts or honey. Chocolate spread is normally sold in glass jars or plastic tubs.

Other articles related to "chocolate spread, spread":

Waffel - Varieties of Waffles
... areas they might be topped with whipped cream, soft fruit or chocolate spread (a practice considered 'inauthentic' by some local connoisseurs) ... Toppings vary from whipped cream, confectioners sugar, soft fruit, chocolate spread, to syrup and butter or margarine ... Butter, peanut butter and sugar are spread on one side of the cooked waffle, and then it is folded into a semicircle to eat ...
Gaufre - Varieties of Waffles
... though in tourist areas they might be topped with whipped cream, soft fruit or chocolate spread (a practice considered 'inauthentic' by some local connoisseurs) ... Toppings vary from whipped cream, confectioners sugar, soft fruit, chocolate spread, to syrup and butter or margarine ... Butter, peanut butter and sugar are spread on one side of the cooked waffle, and then it is folded into a semicircle to eat ...

Famous quotes containing the words spread and/or chocolate:

    Cows sometimes wear an expression resembling wonderment arrested on its way to becoming a question. In the eye of superior intelligence, on the other hand, lies the nil admirari spread out like the monotony of a cloudless sky.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    The man who invented Eskimo Pie made a million dollars, so one is told, but E.E. Cummings, whose verse has been appearing off and on for three years now, and whose experiments should not be more appalling to those interested in poetry than the experiment of surrounding ice-cream with a layer of chocolate was to those interested in soda fountains, has hardly made a dent in the doughy minds of our so-called poetry lovers.
    John Dos Passos (1896–1970)