Chicken Fried Steak

Chicken fried steak (also known as pan-fried steak, CFS or country fried steak) is a breaded cutlet dish consisting of a piece of steak (tenderized cube steak) coated with seasoned flour and pan-fried. It is associated with Southern cuisine. Its name may be due to its similarity in preparation to fried chicken.

Chicken fried steak resembles the Austrian dish Wiener Schnitzel and the Italian-Latin American dish Milanesa, which is a tenderized veal or pork cutlet, coated with flour, eggs, and bread crumbs, and then fried. It is also similar to the recipe for Scottish collops.

Read more about Chicken Fried SteakHistory, Preparation, Variants

Other articles related to "chicken fried steak, steak, fried, chicken fried, fried steak":

Chicken Fried Chicken - Preparation
... Chicken fried steak is prepared by taking a thin cut of beefsteak and tenderizing it by pounding, cubing, or forking ... After this, the steak is fried in a skillet or, less commonly, deep-fried ... Restaurants often call the deep fried version chicken fried and the pan fried type country fried ...
Panado - Chicken Fried Steak
... Chicken fried steak (also known as country fried steak) is an American breaded cutlet dish that may have originated with German and Austrian ... It is a piece of beef steak (tenderized cubed steak) coated with seasoned flour and fried ... name is likely related to the dish being prepared similarly to fried chicken ...
Chicken Fried Steak - Variants
... Typically, in Texas and surrounding states, chicken fried steak is deep-fried in a pan and served with traditional peppered milk gravy ... The same dish is sometimes known as "country fried steak" in other parts of the United States, where it is subject to some regional variations ... there is a brown gravy, and occasionally the meat is either pan-fried with little oil, or simmered in the gravy ...

Famous quotes containing the words steak, chicken and/or fried:

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    Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (b. 1922)

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    Allen Ginsberg (b. 1926)

    Yet, for my part, I was never unusually squeamish; I could sometimes eat a fried rat with a good relish, if it were necessary.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)