Central Intelligence Agency - Organizational Structure - National Clandestine Service

The National Clandestine Service (NCS; formerly the Directorate of Operations) is responsible for collecting foreign intelligence, mainly from clandestine HUMINT sources, and covert action. The new name reflects its having absorbed some Department of Defense HUMINT assets. The NCS was created in an attempt to end years of rivalry over influence, philosophy and budget between the United States Department of Defense and the CIA. The Department of Defense had organized the Defense HUMINT Service, under the Defense Intelligence Agency which, with the Presidential decision, became part of the NCS.

The precise present organization of the NCS is classified.

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Director Of The National Clandestine Service
... The Director of the National Clandestine Service (D/NCS) is a senior United States government official in the U.S ... Central Intelligence Agency who serves as head of the National Clandestine Service (formerly the Directorate of Operations) ...

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