Cell Phone Novel - Characteristics and Literary Style

Characteristics and Literary Style

Because of the short chapter format consisting of around 70-100 words usually less than 200, the phenomenon has brought a new approach to literature, allowing a new vision to potentially redefine traditional writing and the publishing world. Despite the use of cell phones, most of these novels are not written with SMS slang and language. Instead, it has brought out a new era of minimalism and art. In each chapter, readers will be able to experience narration, poetry and even visual arts in the use of carefully chosen line breaks, punctuation, rhythm and white space.

Often, cell phone novels features the use of fragments, conversational, simplistic and delicate language; cliffhangers and dramatic dialogue emphasized by the unseen or omitted becomes a vital part of the reading experience, allowing deeper meanings and interpretations to unfold. Because of the use of poetic language, mood, emotions and internal thoughts are stimulated in the reader easily. Dramatic and drastic plots takes readers through twists and turns, cliffhanger after cliffhanger, always keeping the reader waiting for the next chapter instalment.

The nature of writing and reading on the go, creates a unique experience, allowing the writer and reader to approach literature in a different way opening interactivity between the readers and the writer as the story develops in "real time".

Read more about this topic:  Cell Phone Novel

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