Capital - Forms of Capital

Forms of Capital

See also category: Capital
  • Capital requirement or "bank capital", the requirement that banks keep certain monetary reserves
  • Cultural capital, the advantage individuals can gain from mastering the cultural tastes of a privileged group
  • Financial capital, any form of wealth capable of being employed in the production of more wealth
  • Human capital, workers' skills and abilities as regards their contribution to an economy
  • Infrastructural capital, means of production other than natural capital.
  • Natural capital, the resources of an ecosystem that yields a flow of goods and services into the future
  • Physical capital, any non-human asset made by humans and then used in production
  • Political capital, means by which a politician or political party may gain support or popularity
  • Social capital, the value of social networks to individuals embedded in them
  • Working capital, short term capital needed by the company to finance its operations
  • Intellectual capital, intangible assets, for example, knowledge, resource know-how and processes.

Read more about this topic:  Capital

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