Canterbury East Railway Station

Canterbury East railway station is one of two stations in Canterbury in Kent, England. It is south-southwest of the city centre and is served by Southeastern.

The station and its line were built by London, Chatham and Dover Railway, while Canterbury West was built by South Eastern Railway.

Although called Canterbury East the station is about ½ a mile due south of Canterbury West station, and only about twenty yards to its east.

The framework of the platform canopies were originally installed at the never-opened station at Lullingstone.

The semaphore signals at the station were replaced with coloured lights in December 2011. The elevated signal box remains but is no longer in use, with signalling on the line operated from a control room at Gillingham.

Canterbury East did have ticket barriers but they were removed in early 2011, as they were the only ones of the kind in the country and spare parts were no longer easy to get. Coventry, Cannon Street Tube and Earlsfield are the only other stations to lose their ticket barriers.

Read more about Canterbury East Railway Station:  Services, Gallery, Fictional Reference

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Famous quotes containing the words station, railway, canterbury and/or east:

    How soon country people forget. When they fall in love with a city it is forever, and it is like forever. As though there never was a time when they didn’t love it. The minute they arrive at the train station or get off the ferry and glimpse the wide streets and the wasteful lamps lighting them, they know they are born for it. There, in a city, they are not so much new as themselves: their stronger, riskier selves.
    Toni Morrison (b. 1931)

    Her personality had an architectonic quality; I think of her when I see some of the great London railway termini, especially St. Pancras, with its soot and turrets, and she overshadowed her own daughters, whom she did not understand—my mother, who liked things to be nice; my dotty aunt. But my mother had not the strength to put even some physical distance between them, let alone keep the old monster at emotional arm’s length.
    Angela Carter (1940–1992)

    Therefore Lord God, you are more truly omnipotent, because you have no power through impotence and nothing can be against you.
    —Anselm of Canterbury (1033–1109)

    A puff of wind, a puff faint and tepid and laden with strange odours of blossoms, of aromatic wood, comes out the still night—the first sigh of the East on my face. That I can never forget. It was impalpable and enslaving, like a charm, like a whispered promise of mysterious delight.... The mysterious East faced me, perfumed like a flower, silent like death, dark like a grave.
    Joseph Conrad (1857–1924)