Camarillo White Horses

Some articles on white, camarillo white horse, horse, camarillo, whites:

Deer - Cultural Significance - Literature and Art
... In the Disney film Bambi, he is a white-tailed deer, while in Felix Salten's original book Bambi, A Life in the Woods, he is a roe deer ... Pevensies, now kings and queens of Narnia, chase the White Stag on a hunt, as the Stag is said to grant its captor a wish ... In The Animals of Farthing Wood, a deer called The Great White Stag is the leader of all the animal residents of the nature reserve White Deer Park ...
Yellow-browed Bunting
... heavily streaked, and the underparts are white with an orange hue on the flanks and some fine dark streaks ... The breeding male has a black head with white crown and moustachial stripes and throat ... some yellow in the eyebrow, as well as at least a hint of a white stripe on the crown ...
Adolfo Camarillo - Camarillo’s White Horses
... The first official Camarillo White Horse is a relatively Spanish blooded horse known for its pure white color ... legendary breed dates back to 1921, when Adolfo Camarillo purchased 9-year-old Sultan from Miller and Lux cattle ranch at the California State Fair in Sacramento ... Adolfo would go on to breed Sultan to Morgan mares at the Camarillo Ranch ...
White Trash - In Literature
... Evelyn Greenleaf Sutherland's play Po' White Trash, published in 1900, exposes complicated cultural tensions in the post-Reconstruction South, at the heart of which is the racial status of poor whites ... Zora Neale Hurston's Seraph on the Suwanee (1948) explores images of 'white trash' women ... of class and gender identities among poor whites reflects the eugenics discourses of the 1920s ...
White Trash
... White trash is an American English pejorative term referring to poor white people in the United States, especially in the rural South, suggesting lower social class and degraded living ... a slur, but may also be used self-referentially by whites to jokingly describe their origins ...

Famous quotes containing the words horses and/or white:

    Kings and queens who wear a suit but once, though made by some tailor or dressmaker to their majesties, cannot know the comfort of wearing a suit that fits. They are no better than wooden horses to hang the clean clothes on.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    It is worth the while to detect new faculties in man,—he is so much the more divine; and anything that fairly excites our admiration expands us. The Indian, who can find his way so wonderfully in the woods, possesses an intelligence which the white man does not,—and it increases my own capacity, as well as faith, to observe it. I rejoice to find that intelligence flows in other channels than I knew. It redeems for me portions of what seemed brutish before.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)