Caesar Cipher

In cryptography, a Caesar cipher, also known as Caesar's cipher, the shift cipher, Caesar's code or Caesar shift, is one of the simplest and most widely known encryption techniques. It is a type of substitution cipher in which each letter in the plaintext is replaced by a letter some fixed number of positions down the alphabet. For example, with a shift of 3, A would be replaced by D, B would become E, and so on. The method is named after Julius Caesar, who used it in his private correspondence.

The encryption step performed by a Caesar cipher is often incorporated as part of more complex schemes, such as the Vigenère cipher, and still has modern application in the ROT13 system. As with all single alphabet substitution ciphers, the Caesar cipher is easily broken and in modern practice offers essentially no communication security.

Read more about Caesar CipherExample, History and Usage, Breaking The Cipher

Other articles related to "caesar cipher, cipher, caesar":

Caesar Cipher - Breaking The Cipher
23 haahjrhavujl 24 gzzgiqgzutik 25 fyyfhpfytshj The Caesar cipher can be easily broken even in a ciphertext-only scenario ... that some sort of simple substitution cipher has been used, but not specifically that it is a Caesar scheme an attacker knows that a Caesar cipher is in use, but does not know the shift value ... In the first case, the cipher can be broken using the same techniques as for a general simple substitution cipher, such as frequency analysis or pattern words ...

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