Burma Socialist Programme Party

Burma Socialist Programme Party (Burmese: မြန်မာ့ဆိုရှယ်လစ်လမ်းစဉ်ပါတီ; ; also Burmese acronyms မဆလ ) was formed by the Ne Win's military regime that seized power in 1962 and was the sole political party allowed to exist legally in Burma during the period of military rule from 1964 until its demise in the aftermath of the popular uprising of 1988.

Read more about Burma Socialist Programme PartyHistory, One-party State, Cadre To Mass Party, Youth Wing, Purge, Crisis, Demise

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Burma Socialist Programme Party - Demise
... and appointed as the new Chairman of the Party by the Party Congress ... The Extraordinary Party Congress of July 1988 also rejected Ne Win's call for a national referendum ... The election of Sein Lwin as Party Chairman as well as the refusal by the BSPP to take steps to move towards a multi-party system led to massive demonstrations ...

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