Broadleaf Forests

Some articles on broadleaf forests, forests, forest, broadleaf:

Ecoregions Of Australia - WWF Ecoregions
... Tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf forests Lord Howe Island subtropical forests Norfolk Island subtropical forests Queensland tropical rain forests ...
White-tailed Deer - Ecology
... Although most often thought of as forest animals depending on relatively small openings and edges, white-tailed deer can equally adapt themselves to life in more open prairie, savanna woodlands, and sage ... river valley bottomlands and formerly in the mixed deciduous forest of Eastern United States ... American white-tailed deer prefer tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests, seasonal mixed deciduous forests, savanna, and adjacent wetland ...
Agriculture In Himachal Pradesh - Flora and Fauna
... According to 2003 Forest Survey of India report, legally defined forest areas constitute 66.52% of the area of Himachal Pradesh, although area under tree cover is only 25.78% ... of the state, at lower elevations than the north, has both tropical and subtropical dry broadleaf forests and tropical and subtropical moist broadleaf ... hills, we find a mosaic of western Himalayan broadleaf forests and Himalayan subtropical pine forests ...
Subdivisions Of Nepal - Geography - Environment
... of biomes, from tropical savannas along the Indian border, to subtropical broadleaf and coniferous forests in the Hill Region, to temperate broadleaf and ... These form a mosaic with the Himalayan subtropical broadleaf forests, which occur from 500 to 1,000 metres (1,600 to 3,300 ft) and include the Inner Terai Valleys ... Himalayan subtropical pine forests occur between 1,000 and 2,000 metres (3,300 and 6,600 ft) ...

Famous quotes containing the word forests:

    The great pines stand at a considerable distance from each other. Each tree grows alone, murmurs alone, thinks alone. They do not intrude upon each other. The Navajos are not much in the habit of giving or of asking help. Their language is not a communicative one, and they never attempt an interchange of personality in speech. Over their forests there is the same inexorable reserve. Each tree has its exalted power to bear.
    Willa Cather (1873–1947)