Bridalveil - Hats

Hats

Veils pinned to hats have survived the changing fashions of the centuries and are still common today on formal occasions that require women to wear a hat. However, these veils are generally made of netting or another material not actually designed to hide the face from view, even if the veil can be pulled down.

Read more about this topic:  Bridalveil

Other articles related to "hats, hat":

Clovelly-Kepplestone - School Colours and Uniform
... the uniform consisted of navy blue coats and navy felt hats with hat-band and badge but white coats and black hats on Sundays ... girls wore white blouses and navy blue skirts with Panama hats and, on Sundays, white suits and white coats with black hats ... the interwoven letters CK, was in cream, green and white, as was the hat band worn on the Panamas ...
Cloche Hat - Design
... Cloche hats were usually made of felt so that they conformed to the head, and were typically designed to be worn low on the forehead, with the wearer's eyes only slightly below the brim ... While commonly worn plain, allowing the cut and shape of a well-made hat to take precedence, a cloche could be decorated with appliqu├ęs, embroidery, jeweled brooches ... By the end of the 1920s, it became fashionable to turn the brims on cloche hats upwards ...
Hats

Hats can refer to:

  • Hat, an item of clothing worn on a person's head.
  • de Bono Hats, the six thinking strategies
  • Hats (party), a political faction in Sweden, during the 18th century
  • Hats (album), an album by British group The Blue Nile
  • Hi-hats, one of the essential cymbals in a drum set
Clowns Spinning Hats
... Clowns Spinning Hats is a black-and-white silent film featuring clowns throwing hats back and forth to each other ...

Famous quotes containing the word hats:

    There are several natural phenomena which I shall have to have explained to me before I can keep on going as a resident member of the human race. One is the metamorphosis which hats and suits undergo exactly one week after their purchase, whereby they are changed from smart, intensely becoming articles of apparel into something children use when they want to “dress up like daddy.”
    Robert Benchley (1889–1945)

    My consolation is to think of the women I have known, now that there is no longer such thing as elegance. But how can people who contemplate these horrible creatures under their hats covered in pigeon-houses or gardens, how can they understand the charm of seeing Madame Swann wearing a simple mauve cap or a small hat surmounted by a straight iris?
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)