Bretazenil - Tolerance and Dependence

Tolerance and Dependence

In a study in rats cross-tolerance between the benzodiazepine drug chlordiazepoxide and bretazenil has been demonstrated. In a primate study bretazenil was found to be able to replace the full agonist diazepam in diazepam dependent primates without precipitating withdrawal effects, demonstrating cross tolerance between bretazenil and benzodiazepine agonists, whereas other partial agonists precipitated a withdrawal syndrome. The differences are likely due to differences in instrinsic properties between different benzodiazepine partial agonists. Cross-tolerance has also been shown between bretazenil and full agonist benzodiazepines in rats. In rats tolerance is slower to develop to the anticonvulsant effects compared to the benzodiazepine site full agonist diazepam. However, tolerance developed to the anticonvulsant effects of bretazenil partial agonist more quickly than they developed to imidazenil.

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