Brennan Family Restaurants

The Brennan Family Restaurants are a group of restaurants owned or operated by family members of Owen Brennan of New Orleans, Louisiana. The Brennan family is well known in New Orleans for their successful restaurant dynasty. Not all of the restaurants on this list are financially affiliated with each other. Only the original Brennan's in New Orleans is owned and operated by the children of Owen Brennan; all others are run by his siblings and their descendants.

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