Break Bulk Cargo

In shipping, break bulk cargo or general cargo is a term that covers a great variety of goods that must be loaded individually, and not in intermodal containers nor in bulk as with oil or grain. Ships that carry this sort of cargo are often called general cargo ships. The term break bulk derives from the phrase breaking bulk—the extraction of a portion of the cargo of a ship or the beginning of the unloading process from the ship's holds. These goods may not be in shipping containers. Break bulk cargo is transported in bags, boxes, crates, drums, or barrels. Unit loads of items secured to a pallet or skid are also used.

A break-in-bulk point is a place where goods are transferred from one mode of transport to another, for example the docks where goods transfer from ship to truck.

Break bulk was the most common form of cargo for most of the history of shipping. Since the late 1960s the volume of break bulk cargo has declined dramatically worldwide as containerization has grown. Moving cargo on and off ship in containers is much more efficient, allowing ships to spend less time in port. Break bulk cargo also suffered from greater theft and damage.

Read more about Break Bulk CargoLoading and Unloading, Advantages and Disadvantages

Other articles related to "break bulk cargo, break bulk, bulk, cargo":

Break Bulk Cargo - Advantages and Disadvantages
... neutral presentation The biggest disadvantage with break bulk is that it requires more resources at the wharf at both ends of the transport—longshoremen ... Indeed, the decline of break bulk did not start with containerisation rather, the advent of tankers and bulk carriers reduced the need for transporting liquids in barrels and grains in sacks ... specialised ships and shore facilities to deliver larger amounts of cargo to the dock and effect faster turnarounds with fewer personnel once the ship arrives ...

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